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Encyclopedia Dubuque

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Difference between revisions of "MOORE, Don"

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(New page: The stories for the comic hero, Flash Gordon, were written by Don Moore.MOORE, Don. (Dubuque, IA, abt. 1912-- ). Writer. Moore was able to foresee th...)
 
 
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[[Image:gordon.jpg|left|thumb|150px|The stories for the comic hero, Flash Gordon, were written by Don Moore.]]MOORE, Don. (Dubuque, IA, abt. 1912-- ). Writer. Moore was able to foresee the atomic bomb in 1934, space travel, and missile systems. Between 1934 and 1954, he was the "idea man" for the comic heroes "Flash Gordon" and "Jungle Jim." Moore wrote the story line and described the action.
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[[Image:gordon.jpg|left|thumb|150px|The stories for the comic hero, Flash Gordon, were written by Don Moore.]]MOORE, Don. (Anamosa, IA, Aug. 22, 1904--Venice, FL, Apr. 7, 1986). Moore was able to foresee the atomic bomb in 1934, space travel, and missile systems. Between 1934 and 1954, he was the "idea man" for the comic heroes "Flash Gordon" and "Jungle Jim." Moore wrote the story line and described the action.
  
 
Moore was the son of a U.S. marshal for the Northern District of Iowa when he lived on West 11th Street in Dubuque. He graduated from [[DUBUQUE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL]] in 1919 at the top of his class and later graduated second in his class at Dartmouth.  
 
Moore was the son of a U.S. marshal for the Northern District of Iowa when he lived on West 11th Street in Dubuque. He graduated from [[DUBUQUE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL]] in 1919 at the top of his class and later graduated second in his class at Dartmouth.  
  
Moore spent two years working with the Miami, Florida news media, six years with ''Argosy'' magazine, and eight years with ''Cosmopolitan'' before serving two years with the military in public relations at the Pentagon. He returned to civilian life working four years with Warner Brothers in Hollywood, three years with CBS, one year with RKO Pictures in Hollywood and five years with trade magazines.  During his last years of writing, Moore wrote television scripts for 'Death Valley Days," "Sea Hunt,", "Rawhide," "Studio One," and "Captain Video."
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Moore worked for the ''Miami Herald'' and the ''Miami Beach Beacon'' and then founded the Nassau News Bureau which was renamed the Bahama News Bureau. He was able to thus work for the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI) simultaneously without mentioning he was on the staff of each other's rival. He served six years with ''Argosy'' magazine beginning as the assistant editor in 1930 and becoming editor at the end of the decade. He began eight years in 1934 as the assistant editor ''Cosmopolitan''. The same year King Features approached him with the idea of creating a comic strip to compete with "Buck Rogers," a hero of science fiction. This became the famous "Flash Gordon."
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He returned to civilian life working four years with Warner Brothers in Hollywood, three years with CBS, one year with RKO Pictures in Hollywood and five years with trade magazines.  During his last years of writing, Moore wrote television scripts for 'Death Valley Days," "Sea Hunt,", "Rawhide," "Studio One," and "Captain Video."
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Source:
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1. "Don Moore," IMb. Online: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0601133/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm
  
 
[[Category: Writer]]
 
[[Category: Writer]]

Latest revision as of 20:35, 11 June 2018

The stories for the comic hero, Flash Gordon, were written by Don Moore.
MOORE, Don. (Anamosa, IA, Aug. 22, 1904--Venice, FL, Apr. 7, 1986). Moore was able to foresee the atomic bomb in 1934, space travel, and missile systems. Between 1934 and 1954, he was the "idea man" for the comic heroes "Flash Gordon" and "Jungle Jim." Moore wrote the story line and described the action.

Moore was the son of a U.S. marshal for the Northern District of Iowa when he lived on West 11th Street in Dubuque. He graduated from DUBUQUE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL in 1919 at the top of his class and later graduated second in his class at Dartmouth.

Moore worked for the Miami Herald and the Miami Beach Beacon and then founded the Nassau News Bureau which was renamed the Bahama News Bureau. He was able to thus work for the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI) simultaneously without mentioning he was on the staff of each other's rival. He served six years with Argosy magazine beginning as the assistant editor in 1930 and becoming editor at the end of the decade. He began eight years in 1934 as the assistant editor Cosmopolitan. The same year King Features approached him with the idea of creating a comic strip to compete with "Buck Rogers," a hero of science fiction. This became the famous "Flash Gordon."

He returned to civilian life working four years with Warner Brothers in Hollywood, three years with CBS, one year with RKO Pictures in Hollywood and five years with trade magazines. During his last years of writing, Moore wrote television scripts for 'Death Valley Days," "Sea Hunt,", "Rawhide," "Studio One," and "Captain Video."

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Source:

1. "Don Moore," IMb. Online: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0601133/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm