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Encyclopedia Dubuque

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LATTNER, Paul

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Photo courtesy: Mike Larkin
LATTNER, Paul. (Germany, Jan. 29, 1832--Lattnerville, IA, Jan. 14, 1891). The eldest in a family with three sons and two daughters, Lattner and his family came to the United States in 1847. The men worked on the construction of the New York and Erie Railroad for nearly two years before moving to the western part of that state and worked on an extension of the same line. They moved to Zanesville, Ohio and worked on the Lake Shore Road. It as here that Paul entered the business as a horseshoer. Continually on the move, they lived in Hamilton, Canada; and then Niagara Falls, New York where they had a contract on two miles of the Wabash Railroad and operated a general store. They arrived in Dubuque County in 1856.

The Lattners took a contract to construct three miles of the DUBUQUE AND PACIFIC RAILROAD from Roswell B. MASON. They continued even after the finances of the company failed by accepting 280 acres. In 1860 they purchased 220 acres where Lattnerville later stood and erected a sawmill. Lattner Bros. was a prosperous firm. In 1873 when the partnership dissolved, Paul remained in the general retail store. He introduced beekeeping to eastern Iowa and was said to have had as many as two hundred beehives. He served as justice of the peace and was generally known as "Squire." He later sold the store and in 1880 purchased the Union House hotel in Worthington.

Lattnerville, west of Dubuque, was named in his honor.

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Source:

Obituary, "The Herald," January 21, 1891, p. 4

Goodspeed, Weston Arthur, History of Dubuque County, Iowa. Chicago: Goodspeed Historical Association, 1911, p. 746