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Encyclopedia Dubuque

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Difference between revisions of "HAWKEYE CASKET COMPANY"

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HAWKEYE CASKET COMPANY.  The 1922 through 1929 ''Dubuque City Directory'' listed the corner of Elm and E. 11th.
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HAWKEYE CASKET COMPANY.  The Hawkeye Casket Company dried its own lumber. Once assembled, the casket was taken apart and sent to the cloth room for covering. It was then reassembled for sale. Fifty styles of caskets were offered, but these could be individualized with two hundred different patterns of cloth for covering and one hundred styles of interiors.
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There was a standard stock of about two hundred caskets all completed with an equal number of shells ready for final work.  The annual output of the company was about 3,500 caskets. In addition to cloth-covered caskets, many were manufactured with hardwood and oak and walnut finishes. Some were finished in a process known as stippaleen which hardened before being placed in the ground.  Metal caskets, although sold by the company, were not produced by it. (1)
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The company in 1929 employed an average of fifty persons with five of these full-time cabinet makers. The president of the company was [[MEUSER, William H.|William H. MEUSER]]. (2)
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The 1922 through 1929 ''Dubuque City Directory'' listed the corner of Elm and E. 11th.
  
 
In 1940 the County Board of Supervisors sold the building to [[JACOBSON IRON & METAL COMPANY]] for $4.500 and the current year's taxes which amounted to about $835. (1)
 
In 1940 the County Board of Supervisors sold the building to [[JACOBSON IRON & METAL COMPANY]] for $4.500 and the current year's taxes which amounted to about $835. (1)
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Source:
 
Source:
  
"South End Playground Tract Bought by City," ''Telegraph-Herald'', May 16, 1940, p. 10
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1. "Casket Making Not Understood," ''Telegraph-Herald and Times-Journal'', March 31, 1929, p. 69
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2. Ibid.
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3."South End Playground Tract Bought by City," ''Telegraph-Herald'', May 16, 1940, p. 10
  
 
[[Category: Casket Company]]
 
[[Category: Casket Company]]

Latest revision as of 21:18, 7 October 2018

HAWKEYE CASKET COMPANY. The Hawkeye Casket Company dried its own lumber. Once assembled, the casket was taken apart and sent to the cloth room for covering. It was then reassembled for sale. Fifty styles of caskets were offered, but these could be individualized with two hundred different patterns of cloth for covering and one hundred styles of interiors.

There was a standard stock of about two hundred caskets all completed with an equal number of shells ready for final work. The annual output of the company was about 3,500 caskets. In addition to cloth-covered caskets, many were manufactured with hardwood and oak and walnut finishes. Some were finished in a process known as stippaleen which hardened before being placed in the ground. Metal caskets, although sold by the company, were not produced by it. (1)

The company in 1929 employed an average of fifty persons with five of these full-time cabinet makers. The president of the company was William H. MEUSER. (2)

The 1922 through 1929 Dubuque City Directory listed the corner of Elm and E. 11th.

In 1940 the County Board of Supervisors sold the building to JACOBSON IRON & METAL COMPANY for $4.500 and the current year's taxes which amounted to about $835. (1)

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Source:

1. "Casket Making Not Understood," Telegraph-Herald and Times-Journal, March 31, 1929, p. 69

2. Ibid.

3."South End Playground Tract Bought by City," Telegraph-Herald, May 16, 1940, p. 10