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GAYMAN, L. Vaughn

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Photo courtesy: Bob Reding
Gayman, L. Vaughn. (West Union, OH, Aug. 7, 1908--Dubuque, IA, Aug. 21, 1996). Educator and radio director. In 1914, Gayman built a radio transmitter, using a schematic published in a Boy's Life magazine.

"When I got my transmitter going, I went down and talked to the hardware man. I said, 'What frequency am I on?' He said, 'All of them.' " (1)

In 1937, Gayman came the Dubuque as the news editor of WKBB (later WDBQ) and remained in the position for twenty-eight years. He also began teaching a radio course at LORAS COLLEGE. Gayman was well-known for his rendition of "Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus," which he read every Christmas Eve for thirty years. (2)

Beginning in 1940, Gayman taught radio, speech, and physics at CLARKE COLLEGE. He continued for twenty-five years and also taught speech to nursing students at the Mercy School of Nursing. Gayman later became a member of the news staff of KDTH and did public service programs on KDUB-TV. (3)

In 1976, Gayman was elected to his second term as president of the Iowa Intercollegiate Forensic Association. The same year, he became director of public relations and professor of speech at Divine Word College. Gayman also had a program, "Friends and Neighbors," on television station KDUB and served on the Dubuque Five Flags Commission from 1977 to 1979. In 1983, Archbishop James J. BYRNE presented Gayman with an honorary doctor of letters degree. (4)

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Source:

1. "The Very Early Stations," Online: http://www.wartburg.edu/broadcast/chapter2/chapter2.html

2. Kruse, Len. My Old Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa: Center for Dubuque History-Loras College, 2000, p. 201

3. Ibid., p. 202

4. Ibid., p. 203