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EAGLE POINT PARK

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTiCU31PVy4 A Walk Through Eagle Point

Eagle Point Park. Photo courtesy: City of Dubuque
The entrance to Eagle Point Park.Photo courtesy: National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium-Captain William D. Bowell, Sr. River Library-James Wall-Wild, Registrar
Rock gardens/fish ponds at Eagle Point.

EAGLE POINT PARK. In 1907 Charles M. Robinson, a noted park specialist, visited Dubuque. After touring scenic locations, he remarked, "I have never seen a place where the Almighty has done more and mankind less, than Dubuque." (1) Judge Oliver Perry SHIRAS, one of Dubuque's leading citizens, took the remark as a challenge. In April 1908, he organized a citizens' commission to study the possibility of creating a park.

On June 12, 1908, the beginning of Eagle Point Park was created from one hundred acres purchased from Alphons L. RHOMBERG for $20,000 with aid from the Civic Division of the DUBUQUE WOMEN'S CLUB. (2) The site was intended as a picnic and recreational area. Charles Robinson was hired by the citizens' committee as the landscape architect. Charles Lowrie was retained as the park planner, and Thomas Jess, a surveyor, prepared the plans.

Eagle Point Park rests on the bluffs above the Mississippi River. Photo courtesy: John Knepper
Improvements to the land in 1908 totaled $10,000. A fence was installed along the bluff for the protection of visitors. Ravine Road, the entrance to the park, was constructed in the valley south and west of the park using teams of horses and manual labor. Inexpensive labor was also used to erect hitching posts, rest rooms, tables, and benches.
Eaglepointsteps.gif
In February 1910 the Dubuque city council, at the suggestion of Judge Shiras, adopted an ordinance providing for the election of three park commissioners. (3) In the April election, Shiras won along with Herbert Adams and Frank J. PIEKENBROCK to make up Dubuque's first park board. This gave Shiras the opportunity to go beyond private donations for the park's development. Maintenance and improvement funds, originally raised by private contributions, were later provided through taxes.

When Eagle Point Park was opened to the public in June 1910 there were two ways to reach the park. The Shiras Avenue entrance remained the same for years. The other approach was for walkers. A steep and winding pathway beginning at the north end of Rhomberg Avenue led up the hill into the park. (4)

Park rules were published in the newspaper. Among the fifteen rules was prohibition of driving automobiles faster than five miles per hour or hitching horses to the trees. The use of vulgar language was forbidden as was the use of firearms or alcohol. Violators of any of the rules could be removed from the park or face fines up to $100 and or imprisonment for up to thirty days. (5)

Within two months of the park's opening, the Dubuque Park Commission approved improving the pathway. (6) After trading one-half acre of land with the EAGLE POINT LIME WORKS, a set of stairs was constructed allowing people to reach the park from Rhomberg Avenue. Cement steps of 7-inch tread, five feet wide made for a much easier climb. (7) Breath-taking views of the MISSISSIPPI RIVER were available from landings located along the staircase that crept up the bluff.

In 1910 a water system was installed within the park. Contractors Keller and Luchterhand constructed a 250 barrel reservoir for water that was obtained from a well drilled in 1909. (8) Plans were made in 1910 to pipe the water to other locations in the park. The right to sell refreshments in the park was awarded by the Park Commission to Frank J. Pfiffner. (9)

Photo courtesy: Bob Reding
Eagle Point Park, then 133 acres, was dedicated on June 17, 1910. (10) Shiras refused the honor of having the park named in his honor by requesting that the park be named remembering the legend of EAGLE POINT. He was willing, however, to make a speech dedicating the park to the people of Dubuque. The NATHANIEL GREEN CADETS were also featured. (11)
Photo courtesy: National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium-Captain William D. Bowell, Sr. River Library-James Wall-Wild, Registrar

The construction of a proposed street car entrance to the park was blocked by the Ham estate at the base of the bluff. Negotiations were completed with Sarah Ham on May 1, 1911, when a price of $8,500 was agreed upon for the necessary land. Ham's refusal to then sign the bill of sale held up the construction for another year until May 1912. (12)

Work began almost immediately. UNION ELECTRIC COMPANY laid track and constructed a turnaround and waiting station. (13) The spur line, gradually climbing the 6 percent grade into the park, was opened on September 28, 1912. The first car, carrying company officials, left Eighth and Main and stopped at the DUBUQUE CITY HALL for city officials, before proceeding to the park. A crowd estimated at five thousand heard the opening day speeches.

The development of the forestry stage of Eagle Point Park has been credited to P. L. Phelps, a forestry expert from Rockford, Illinois, and former supervisor of national forests in the Pacific Northwest. Under his direction dead timber, trees stunting the growth of other trees, and trees blocking road construction were removed. The park is noted for its diverse native trees. These include red oak, black oak, white oak, burr oak, white birch, black cherry, pin cherry, choak cherry, hawthorne crab apple, cotton wood, gray popular, linden, white elms, red elms, juneberry, aspen, willow, plum and sycamore. Trees planted in the park include pines, spruce, juniper and sugar maples. Native shrubbery includes gray dogwood, red dogwood, red sumac, staghorn sumac, bittersweet, sheepberry, and roses. (14)

In 1912 Walter H. Cullen of the grocery firm of CULLEN AND NICKS donated a large bald eagle he had captured to the board of park commissioners. A large cage was constructed in which it was displayed. (15)

The Hawkeye Conference Tennis Tournament was held in 1917 on the courts at Eagle Point with nine colleges participated in the doubles competition. (16) During the same year, the DUBUQUE TRAVELING AND BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATION began fundraising to build the Shiras Memorial shelter in memory of the judge, who had died in 1916. Located on Gun Point, the building was dedicated to Shiras on May 29, 1921. (17)

Construction of fish ponds during the 1930s promised one of many attractions at Eagle Point Park. Photo courtesy: Center for Dubuque History, Loras College
Fish pond under construction. Photo courtesy:Rob Klauer

During the GREAT DEPRESSION, the park board decided to construct a stone shelter to provide employment that would be created with federal funds. (18) To receive the money from the Civil Works Administration (later Works Project Administration (WPA)), however, the park had to have a plan and someone who would accept a supervisory role. At the same time, Alfred CALDWELL had decided to begin a career of his own. Caldwell came to Dubuque highly recommended by renowned landscape architect Jen Jensen. (19) Caldwell was hired as the project supervisor in March, 1934.

Caldwell directed the construction of the shelter area which he called, "The City in a Garden." (20) He was quoted as saying, "The gods were constructed out of form, wherefore beautiful built things become temples." (21) Although not a student of Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous architect's influence with Prairie Style Architecture is easily seen in the emphasis on horizontal features; large, board overhands, use of natural materials and the careful effort to make structures blend with their surroundings. The buildings in the rock shelter area appear to have come from the area rather than having been constructed. (22) Caldwell was forced out of the project in the spring of 1936 before the dedication of the shelter area in 1937. In its decision to discharge Caldwell, the park board charged him with making unauthorized and unpopular park policy decisions. (23) One such decision led to the cutting down of ten Lombardy popular trees near the park's north exit to improve the view.

Wendelin RETTENBERGER, one of Caldwell's three assistants and the person who finished Caldwell's work, remembered that money was tight. Most of the $200,000 the project received went to the four hundred workers. There was only about $18,000 a year to spend including gasoline and all utilities. (24) Fish ponds, rock walls, and Indian council rings in the park were created. In 2004, the park shelters designed by Caldwell were recognized by the American Institute of Architects as among the most influential structures in Iowa from the decade. (25)

In 1933 as part of Dubuque's centennial celebration, the Neuman LOG CABIN was moved from Second and Locust STREETS to the park. Believed to be the oldest cabin in Iowa, the building was the scene of the first Mass celebrated in Dubuque. (26)

In 1936 local artist Jo Dillon prepared three panel murals for the rock shelter house. (27) President Franklin Roosevelt made a campaign stop in Dubuque on October 9, 1936, and made a point of touring the WPA work at Eagle Point. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt wrote in her “My Day” diary entry for Oct. 10,

      The park which is on Eagle Rock Point commands a glorious view 
      of the Mississippi River and is being much improved by WPA work. 
      One little item which the commissioner of parks mentioned particularly 
      interested me. They have used native stone for the buildings in the park, 
      and though many of the workers have never done any similar work before, 
      he said they were not building themselves houses of this stone.”

New Deal critics had called the WPA a poor use of tax dollars, but when Roosevelt saw the WPA work at Eagle Point, President Roosevelt is reported to have said, “This is my idea of a worthwhile boondoggle.” (28)

In 1950 a proposal was first made to convert the former streetcar right-of-way into a bobsled or toboggan run. (29)

In 1957 park commissioners darkened all the electrical sockets for the first time since they had been installed. Steel plates were put over some sockets, and the power was turned off to others. The problem was that people were abusing the system. People were plugging in ovens, frying pans, electric coffee pots and toasters. Some women were even taking their laundry to the park for ironing. The climax came when several fuses were blown during a party for the park commissioners. (30)

In 1962 dramatic activities for children and adults were again being offered by the Eagle Point Summer Theater under the sponsorship of the Dubuque Recreation Department. Four one-act plays and a full length three-act play were planned. Directing the plays were John Clifford and Anzo Manoni of the LORAS COLLEGE speech department. (31)

In 1982 Eagle Point Park became the first city park in Iowa to have an entrance fee. In the decade since the fee was first charged, the city received more than $300,000 that is used for improvements including upkeep on the roads and playground equipment. The fee was originally met with protest. It was assessed at a time when alcohol consumption and rowdy behavior of some patrons was becoming a problem. The one dollar fee seemed to move the problems elsewhere. (32)

Since the original purchase, seventeen parcels have been purchased or donated, which brings the park to its present size. (33)

In 2003 the proposed development of a 64-unit condominium below Eagle Point Park by Royal Oaks Development led to clit candles and protest songs on November 3rd by those opposed to the project. (34)


Eagle Point Pagoda. Photo courtesy: Jim Massey
Photo courtesy: Jim Massey
Photo courtesy: Bob Reding
Completed fishponds at Eagle Point.
Eagle Point Park draws visitors from around the United States.
Photo courtesy: Bob Reding
An early drive through the park. Photo courtesy: National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium-Captain William D. Bowell, Sr. River Library-James Wall-Wild, Registrar
Flowers at Eagle Point.
Path up from the High Bridge. Photo courtesy: Bob Reding
A rare photo of the steps to Eagle Point Park being constructed. Photo courtesy: Rob Klauer
The same steps that were being constructed after they were finished Photo courtesy: Rob Klauer
One of the capstones pictured that was saved when the steps were being demolished.Photo courtesy: Rob Klauer
Shiras Memorial and High Bridge.Photo courtesy:John Knepper
Photo courtesy:John Knepper
Photo courtesy:John Knepper
Early stages of popular pavilion overlooking the Mississippi
Shiras Memorial Shelter.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTiCU31PVy4

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Source:

1. "Eagle Point Park History," Dubuque, Iowa Official Website, Online: http://www.cityofdubuque.org/index.aspx?NID=1149

2. Ibid.

3. "Shiras Memorial Dedicated Sunday," Telegraph Herald, May 30, 1921, p. 10. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=F4RiAAAAIBAJ&sjid=iHcNAAAAIBAJ&pg=1165,5053959&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

4. Kruse, Len. "My Old Dubuque," Dubuque, Iowa: Center for Dubuque History, Loras College, 2000, p. 68

5. "Park Rules Are Given to the Public," Telegraph Herald, May 1, 1910, p. 10. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=xm5CAAAAIBAJ&sjid=86oMAAAAIBAJ&pg=6080,1754952&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

6. Kruse, Len, p. 68

7. Ibid., p. 69

8. "Eagle Point Park Plans," Telegraph Herald, May 15, 1910, p. 16. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=1G5CAAAAIBAJ&sjid=86oMAAAAIBAJ&pg=2805,3277634&dq=eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

9. Ibid.

10. "Eagle Point Park is Dedicated," Telegraph Herald, June 17, 1910, p. 10. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=9W5CAAAAIBAJ&sjid=86oMAAAAIBAJ&pg=2885,6666337&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

11. "Eagle Point Park To Formally Open," Telegraph Herald, June 6, 1910, p. 4

12. "Ham House Near Eagle Point Sold," Telegraph Herald, May 20, 1912, p. 7. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=s-BBAAAAIBAJ&sjid=BqoMAAAAIBAJ&pg=2869,2233462&dq=eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

13. "Eagle Point Park History."

14. "Many Trees in Dubuque Centuries Old; Some of Them are Older Than City," Telegraph Herald and Times Journal, September 16, 1934, p. 3. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=CdZBAAAAIBAJ&sjid=4qkMAAAAIBAJ&pg=2121,3357794&dq=eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

15. "Eagle for Beautiful Park," Telegraph Herald, April 24, 1912, p. 11

16. Langton, Diane. "Time Machine: Eagle Point Park Dubuque Distiller Set Aside Land; Depression-era Workers Enhanced It," Cedar Rapids Gazette, October 10, 2016. Online: http://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/archive/time-machine/time-machine-eagle-point-park-dubuque-distiller-set-aside-land-depression-era-workers-enhanced-it-20161010

17. "Shiras Memorial Dedicated Sunday,"

18. Chandler, Curt, "Eagle Point History," Telegraph Herald, May 21, 1978, p. 35. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=ncJBAAAAIBAJ&sjid=B6oMAAAAIBAJ&pg=5971,3132466&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

19. Ibid.

20. Fyten, David. "40 Years Take Their Toll on Eagle Point Pavilions," Telegraph Herald, September 15, 1974, p. 25. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Bf5QAAAAIBAJ&sjid=DL8MAAAAIBAJ&pg=5307,2619661&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

21. Ibid.

22. Ibid.

23. Ibid

24. Chandler, Curt.

25. Szeszycki, Emily, "Local Bridge, Park Shelters Honored for Architecture," Telegraph Herald, October 16, 2004, p. 3. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Pp1dAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0VwNAAAAIBAJ&pg=2444,3334905&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

26. Thompson, Dave. "Park Board Cool to Log Cabin Plan," Telegraph Herald, March 11, 1963, p. 32. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=bhJRAAAAIBAJ&sjid=I8sMAAAAIBAJ&pg=5880,1380607&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

27. "Young Artist Scores at Eagle Point Park," Telegraph Herald, June 7, 1936, p. 17. Online: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=yNBBAAAAIBAJ&sjid=-KkMAAAAIBAJ&pg=3049,3039355&dq=history+of+eagle+point+park+dubuque&hl=en

28. Langton

29. "Winter Sports Plans Delayed," Telegraph Herald, January 6, 1950, p. 6. Online: https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=aEyKTaVlRPYC&dat=19500106&printsec=frontpage&hl=en

30. "Great Electrical Abuse; Park Shuts Off Juice," Telegraph Herald, July 14, 1957, p. 4

31. "Eagle Point Plays Planned," Telegraph Herald, May 20, 1962, p. 11

32. Japsen, Bruce. "Eagle Point Park Fee Supported," Telegraph Herald, October 5, 1992, p. 1

33. "Eagle Point Park History"

34. "Chronology," Telegraph Herald, January 1, 2004, p. 52