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Encyclopedia Dubuque

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Difference between revisions of "ALLYN, Eunice E. Gibbs"

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[[Image:allyn.jpg|left|thumb|150px|]]ALLYN, Eunice E. Gibbs. (MRS.) (Brecksville, a suburb of Cleveland, OH, 1847--Dubuque, IA, June 30, 1916). Gibbs was a niece of [[ADAMS, Mary Newbury|Mary Newbury ADAMS]]. She intended to become a teacher, but her mother discouraged her and she remained at home, going into society and writing for local papers. Her articles were signed by various pen-names in order to avoid displeasing one of her brothers, who did not wish to have a "blue-stocking" in the family. Her first published poems appeared in the Cleveland "Plain Dealer," when she was only thirteen years old. (1)
[[Image:cats.png|right|thumb|150px|]]ALLYN, Eunice E. Gibbs. (MRS.) (Brecksville, a suburb of Cleveland, OH-- ). Gibbs was a niece of [[ADAMS, Mary Newbury|Mary Newbury ADAMS]]. She intended to become a teacher, but her mother discouraged her and she remained at home, going into society and writing for local papers. Her articles were signed by various pen-names in order to avoid displeasing one of her brothers, who did not wish to have a "blue-stocking" in the family. Her first published poems appeared in the Cleveland "Plain Dealer," when she was only thirteen years old.
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Besides composing poems for recitation in school, she often wrote songs, both words and music, when she could not find songs suited to various occasions.
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Besides composing poems for recitation in school, she often wrote songs, both words and music, when she could not find songs suited to various occasions.  
  
 
In 1873 she was married to Clarence G. Allyn, of Nyack, N.Y. After spending several years at Nyack, New London, Conn., and Auburn, N.Y., they moved to Dubuque.
 
In 1873 she was married to Clarence G. Allyn, of Nyack, N.Y. After spending several years at Nyack, New London, Conn., and Auburn, N.Y., they moved to Dubuque.
  
Mrs. Allyn was a prominent member of the Dubuque Ladies' Literary Union, and for eight years she served as president of the Dubuque Woman's Christian Temperance Union. She was also connected with the local press at times and won distinction as an artist. It was her artistic abilities that led in November, 1893 to her being chosen by the Iowa World's Fair Commission to make a water color picture of the corn pavilion exhibited in the Iowa building at the World's Fair. (2)
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[[Image:catsa.png|left|thumb|250px|]]Mrs. Allyn was a prominent member of the Dubuque Ladies' Literary Union, and for eight years she served as president of the Dubuque Woman's Christian Temperance Union. She was also connected with the local press at times and won distinction as an artist. It was her artistic abilities that led in November, 1893 to her being chosen by the Iowa World's Fair Commission to make a water color picture of the corn pavilion exhibited in the Iowa building at the World's Fair. (2) Allyn's '''The Cats' Convention''' was published by Cochrane Publishing Co., New York (1909) and was reviewed by '''Watson's Jeffersonian Magazine''' the following year. (3) The work is illustrated with drawings of many cats of various styles of attractive beauty and picturesque ugliness, all created by Allyn. (4)
  
 
Before her marriage, she gained valuable experience as Washington correspondent of the Chicago "Inter-Ocean," a position which she filled for a year. She also wrote numerous articles for the St. Louis "Globe," the New York "World" and various New York, Boston, Indianapolis, Philadelphia and Chicago journals.  
 
Before her marriage, she gained valuable experience as Washington correspondent of the Chicago "Inter-Ocean," a position which she filled for a year. She also wrote numerous articles for the St. Louis "Globe," the New York "World" and various New York, Boston, Indianapolis, Philadelphia and Chicago journals.  
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2. "Municipal Molecules," ''Dubuque Daily Herald'', November 2, 1893, p. 4
 
2. "Municipal Molecules," ''Dubuque Daily Herald'', November 2, 1893, p. 4
  
http://iagenweb.org/boards/dubuque/biographies/index.cgi?read=268563
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3. Watson, Thomas Edward (1910). '''Watson's Jeffersonian Magazine'''. 5 (Public domain ed.). Jeffersonian Publishing Company.
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4.  Carleton, Will (1910). Every where ... (Public domain ed.). Every Where Publishing Company.
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[[Category: Author]]
 
[[Category: Author]]

Latest revision as of 12:20, 9 August 2018

Allyn.jpg
ALLYN, Eunice E. Gibbs. (MRS.) (Brecksville, a suburb of Cleveland, OH, 1847--Dubuque, IA, June 30, 1916). Gibbs was a niece of Mary Newbury ADAMS. She intended to become a teacher, but her mother discouraged her and she remained at home, going into society and writing for local papers. Her articles were signed by various pen-names in order to avoid displeasing one of her brothers, who did not wish to have a "blue-stocking" in the family. Her first published poems appeared in the Cleveland "Plain Dealer," when she was only thirteen years old. (1)

Besides composing poems for recitation in school, she often wrote songs, both words and music, when she could not find songs suited to various occasions.

In 1873 she was married to Clarence G. Allyn, of Nyack, N.Y. After spending several years at Nyack, New London, Conn., and Auburn, N.Y., they moved to Dubuque.

Catsa.png
Mrs. Allyn was a prominent member of the Dubuque Ladies' Literary Union, and for eight years she served as president of the Dubuque Woman's Christian Temperance Union. She was also connected with the local press at times and won distinction as an artist. It was her artistic abilities that led in November, 1893 to her being chosen by the Iowa World's Fair Commission to make a water color picture of the corn pavilion exhibited in the Iowa building at the World's Fair. (2) Allyn's The Cats' Convention was published by Cochrane Publishing Co., New York (1909) and was reviewed by Watson's Jeffersonian Magazine the following year. (3) The work is illustrated with drawings of many cats of various styles of attractive beauty and picturesque ugliness, all created by Allyn. (4)

Before her marriage, she gained valuable experience as Washington correspondent of the Chicago "Inter-Ocean," a position which she filled for a year. She also wrote numerous articles for the St. Louis "Globe," the New York "World" and various New York, Boston, Indianapolis, Philadelphia and Chicago journals.

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Source:

1. "Our Writers," Dubuque Daily Herald, April 7, 1895, p. 7

2. "Municipal Molecules," Dubuque Daily Herald, November 2, 1893, p. 4

3. Watson, Thomas Edward (1910). Watson's Jeffersonian Magazine. 5 (Public domain ed.). Jeffersonian Publishing Company.

4. Carleton, Will (1910). Every where ... (Public domain ed.). Every Where Publishing Company.